Free shipping on Orders over $69.95 to USA

Email for support   [email protected]

Flags of the American Revolution

American Flags Of The Revolution    
   
Liberty and Union Flag
As Revolutionary fervor began to sweep the colonies in the 1770s, Americans created new symbols of their discontent with England. Flags with “liberty” inscribed upon them became popular. One of the first liberty flags was this example that was raised at Taunton, Mass., in 1774. 
Bunker Hill Flag
Just as the rattlesnake was a symbol of the South, the pine tree was the symbol of the Northern colonies, particularly Massachusetts. While this flag has long been associated with the American forces at the Battle of Bunker Hill, its actual presence at the battle is in doubt. The flag appears prominently in John Trumbull’s painting of the battle. Though Trumbull was an eyewitness, he did not paint the battle until 1785-86. 
Bunker Hill Flag, Version Two 
This version of the Bunker Hill Flag is based on the report of B.J. Lossing, a 19th century historian. He said that it was described to him in 1848-1850 by “an intelligent old lady” whose father told her that he had hoisted it in the Breed’s Hill redoubt. Lossing is notoriously unreliable.
Continental or Union Flag
References to flags called ‘Continental’ or ‘Union’ colors appear in American records throughout the Revolution, and from late 1775 to mid-1777 it is believed that these flags resembled the British red ensign, but with a field of red and white stripes instead of solid red. While this flag is often considered the first unofficial American national standard, the origin of its design and the extent of the flag’s use is uncertain. 
Standard of the Philadelphia Light Horse
This well-documented flag includes numerous symbols of American independence. In the center of the flag’s blue shield is a gold knot with 13 scrolls, symbolizing the 13 colonies. The flag was carried at the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine and Germantown. 
Fort Johnson and Fort Sullivan Flag 
This flag, without the “Liberty” motto, is believed to have been the first American flag flown in South Carolina. It was designed by Col. William Moultrie, who was requested by the local Committee of Safety to make a flag for Fort Johnson on James Island off Charleston in 1775. Seven months later, in January 1776, a fort was built on Sullivan’s Island in Charleston Harbor, directly across from Fort Johnson. One memoir said the Fort Sullivan flag was emblazoned with the word “Liberty.”
Standard of the Rhode Island Regiment of 1781
Troops fought under their own regimental flags during the Revolution, and it would have been quite unusual for soldiers 
to fight under a continental or national standard. Indeed, throughout the Revolution the national standard was used primarily to identify ships or forts or army headquarters, and it was rarely if ever flown at any battle on land. The First and Second Rhode Island Regiments were combined in 1781, and fought under a flag made of white silk with a blue silk canton with 13 painted five-point stars. The anchor in the center of the flag was surrounded by a motto that contained the word Hope. 
Navy Ensign 
The Continental Navy was established in late 1775, and it was especially important that its ships be outfitted with flags, to enable other vessels to identify them – at a distance – as ally or enemy. The rattlesnake and motto “Don’t Tread on Me” appear to have been emblems of the South, and Benjamin Franklin and John Adams reported in 1778 that South Carolina’s vessels flew a flag with a rattlesnake and 13 stripes. The symbol and motto was also adopted by some vessels of the Continental Navy. 
John Paul Jones Stars and Stripes
John Paul Jones, the most celebrated naval figure of the Revolution, captured the British ship Serapis in 1779, even though his own vessel, the Bonhomme Richard, sank during the battle. Legend hold that John Paul Jones hoisted on the captured Serapis a flag with irregularly sequenced red, white and blue stripes, and a blue canton with 13 eight-pointed stars. The story is supported by a watercolor drawing that was supposedly made by Jones or by a Dutch artist shortly after the Serapis arrived at a Dutch harbor in 1779. The watercolor was not discovered until 1924 and its origins are still debated by flag historians. Flags similar to the “John Paul Jones” were used by the Continental Navy in 1779, but the story leaves some questions unanswered. 
Standard of the Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy
Christopher Gadsden, South Carolina delegate to the Continental Congress and briefly chariman of the Marine Committee, presented a rattlesnake flag to the South Carolina Congress. The South Carolina Congressional record states the flag, with a rattlesnake and the words “Don’t Tread On Me,” was to be used by the commander in chief of the American navy. There is some evidence to suggest that the flag was flown by Navy Commander Esek Hopkins on his flagship Alfred in 1776.
Stars and Stripes
On June 14, 1777,. the Continental Congress resolved that “the flag of the United States be 13 stripes alternate red and white, that the union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” Contrary to popular myth, Betsy Ross did not make the first flag and George Washington was not the designer. (The Betsy Ross story was first floated in 1870 by her great-grandson.) The Congressional resolution left many details of the flag’s design up to individual flag makers. Flags were made not only with red and white stripes, but with red and blue stripes, blue and white stripes, red and green stripes, and red, white and blue stripes. There were even greater variation in star designs. Stars were made with five points, six points, or eight points. They were arranged in circles, squares, ovals and many different configurations of rows. 
RU Flag Taunton Flag, Liberty and Union Flag 3 X 5 ft. Standard
Taunton Liberty & Union Flag

Liberty and Union Flag

As Revolutionary fervor began to sweep the colonies in the 1770s, Americans created new symbols of their discontent with England. Flags with “liberty” inscribed upon them became popular. One of the first liberty flags was this example that was raised at Taunton, Mass., in 1774. 

Bunker Hill Flag

AKA 3rd Flag of New England 

Just as the rattlesnake was a symbol of the South, the pine tree was the symbol of the Northern colonies, particularly Massachusetts. While this flag has long been associated with the American forces at the Battle of Bunker Hill, its actual presence at the battle is in doubt. The flag appears prominently in John Trumbull’s painting of the battle. Though Trumbull was an eyewitness, he did not paint the battle until 1785-86.

The Continental Flag was the third Flag of Connecticut, and is today the flag of Lincoln County, Maine.

 

Bunker Hill 3rd New England
Bunker Hill by Trumbull
Print shows an idealized view of the battle at Bunker Hill, Boston, between colonists and British troops.
Bunker Hill Flag Blue Lossing Version

Bunker Hill Lossing Version

This version of the Bunker Hill Flag is based on the report of B.J. Lossing, a 19th century historian. He said that it was described to him in 1848-1850 by “an intelligent old lady” whose father told her that he had hoisted it in the Breed’s Hill redoubt. Lossing is notoriously unreliable. Described on page 93-96 this is an unlikely flag to have been flown at bunker hill. The conclusion of many historians is that no flag was flown there.

Continental or Union Flag

References to flags called ‘Continental’ or ‘Union’ colors appear in American records throughout the Revolution, and from late 1775 to mid-1777 it is believed that these flags resembled the British red ensign, but with a field of red and white stripes instead of solid red. While this flag is often considered the first unofficial American national standard, the origin of its design and the extent of the flag’s use is uncertain. 

Philadelphia Light Horse Flag - Historic Flag Series - 6-cent 1968 issue U.S. stamp.

Standard of the Philadelphia Light Horse

This well-documented flag includes numerous symbols of American independence. In the center of the flag’s blue shield is a gold knot with 13 scrolls, symbolizing the 13 colonies. The flag was carried at the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine and Germantown. 

Fort Johnson and Fort Sullivan Flag Ft Moultrie

This flag, without the “Liberty” motto, is believed to have been the first American flag flown in South Carolina. It was designed by Col. William Moultrie, who was requested by the local Committee of Safety to make a flag for Fort Johnson on James Island off Charleston in 1775. Seven months later, in January 1776, a fort was built on Sullivan’s Island in Charleston Harbor, directly across from Fort Johnson. One memoir said the Fort Sullivan flag was emblazoned with the word “Liberty.”

Ft Moultrie Flag Ft Sullivan Flag
vendor-unknown US State Flags Rhode Island Regiment 3 x 5 Nylon Dyed Flag (USA Made)

Standard of the Rhode Island Regiment of 1781

Troops fought under their own regimental flags during the Revolution, and it would have been quite unusual for soldiers 
to fight under a continental or national standard. Indeed, throughout the Revolution the national standard was used primarily to identify ships or forts or army headquarters, and it was rarely if ever flown at any battle on land. The First and Second Rhode Island Regiments were combined in 1781, and fought under a flag made of white silk with a blue silk canton with 13 painted five-point stars. The anchor in the center of the flag was surrounded by a motto that contained the word Hope. 

First Navy Jack

Navy Ensign: The Continental Navy was established in late 1775, and it was especially important that its ships be outfitted with flags, to enable other vessels to identify them – at a distance – as ally or enemy. The rattlesnake and motto “Don’t Tread on Me” appear to have been emblems of the South, and Benjamin Franklin and John Adams reported in 1778 that South Carolina’s vessels flew a flag with a rattlesnake and 13 stripes. The symbol and motto was also adopted by some vessels of the Continental Navy. 

Collins/Eder Flag 1st Navy Jack 3 x 5 Dyed Nylon (USA Made)
Gadsden

Standard of the Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy

Gadsden Flag: Christopher Gadsden, South Carolina delegate to the Continental Congress and briefly chariman of the Marine Committee, presented a rattlesnake flag to the South Carolina Congress. The South Carolina Congressional record states the flag, with a rattlesnake and the words “Dont Tread On Me,” was to be used by the commander in chief of the American navy. There is some evidence to suggest that the flag was flown by Navy Commander Esek Hopkins on his flagship Alfred in 1776.

John Paul Jones Stars and Stripes

Serapis Flag: John Paul Jones, the most celebrated naval figure of the Revolution, captured the British ship Serapis in 1779, even though his own vessel, the Bonhomme Richard, sank during the battle. Legend hold that John Paul Jones hoisted on the captured Serapis a flag with irregularly sequenced red, white and blue stripes, and a blue canton with 13 eight-pointed stars. The story is supported by a watercolor drawing that was supposedly made by Jones or by a Dutch artist shortly after the Serapis arrived at a Dutch harbor in 1779. The watercolor was not discovered until 1924 and its origins are still debated by flag historians. Flags similar to the “John Paul Jones” were used by the Continental Navy in 1779, but the story leaves some questions unanswered. 

vendor-unknown Historic War Flags John Paul Jones Flag - Serapis Flag - 3 x 5 Nylon Dyed (USA Made)
Washington Cruisers Appeal to Heaven

Washington Cruisers Flag

The Tree Flag (or Appeal to Heaven Flag) was one of the flags used during the American Revolution. The flag, featuring a pine tree with the motto “An Appeal to God” or, more usually, “An Appeal to Heaven”, was used originally by a squadron of six cruisers commissioned under George Washington‘s authority as commander in chief of the Continental Army in October 1775. It was also used by Massachusetts state navy vessels in addition to privateers sailing from Massachusetts.
In 2020 the flag is used in Christian prayer rallies across America by prayer leaders like Dutch Sheets.

Gostelowe Return Number 10

One of the flags returned to Johnathan Gostelow who enumerated many standards (flags) this being one of them. Unknown who used it. The flag has a yellow field with an armored arm with sword. “Resistance to Tyrants is Obedience to God” written on it is credited to Benjamin Franklin. Thomas Jefferson (3rd US President and framer of Declaration of Independence) had it engraved on a ring. This symbol was used on the bedford Troop of Minutemen and is in the Arms of Massachusetts.

Resistance to tyrants is obedience to god
Collins/Eder Flag Betsy Ross Fully Sewn & Embroidered Nylon 2' x 3' Flag (USA Made)

Stars and Strips

On June 14, 1777,. the Continental Congress resolved that “the flag of the United States be 13 stripes alternate red and white, that the union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” Contrary to popular myth, Betsy Ross did not make the first flag and George Washington was not the designer. (The Betsy Ross story was first floated in 1870 by her great-grandson.) The Congressional resolution left many details of the flag’s design up to individual flag makers. Flags were made not only with red and white stripes, but with red and blue stripes, blue and white stripes, red and green stripes, and red, white and blue stripes. There were even greater variation in star designs. Stars were made with five points, six points, or eight points. They were arranged in circles, squares, ovals and many different configurations of rows. 

365 day guarantee
Unhappy With Your Product? We’ll Take It Back!

We stand by our high-quality products and your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed.

We Ship Worldwide

Offered in the country of usage

100% Secure Checkout

PayPal / MasterCard / Visa / Amex / Discover / Venmo

We use encrypted SSL security to ensure that your credit card information is 100% protected.

%d bloggers like this: